Disc Golf

Disc golf (also called Frisbee Golf or sometimes Frolf) is a flying disc sport in which players throw a disc at a target, and is played using rules similar to golf. It is often played on a course of 9 or 18 holes, but other formats are common. Players complete a hole by throwing a disc from a tee area toward a target, throwing again from the landing position of the disc until the target is reached. Players seek to complete a course in the lowest number of total throws.

The golf discs used today are much smaller and heavier than traditional flying discs, typically 8–9 inches (20–23 cm) in diameter and weighing between 120 and 180 grams. Discs used for disc golf are designed and shaped for control, speed, and accuracy, while general-purpose flying discs, such as those used for playing guts or ultimate, have a more traditional shape, similar to a catch disc. There is a wide variety of discs used in disc golf and they are generally divided into three categories: putters, all-purpose mid-range discs, and drivers.

Disc golf courses usually have nine or 18 holes, and exceptions most often have holes in multiples of three. Holes are designed to require a range of different throws to challenge players with different strengths or particular skills. An average course hole should range around 200–240 feet (61–73 m) per hole. Course designers use trees, bushes, elevation changes, water hazards, and distance variation, along with out-of-bounds zones and mandatory flight paths, to make each hole challenging and unique. Many courses include multiple tee positions or multiple target positions to cater to players of different ability levels.

While there are many different grips and styles to throwing the disc, there are two basic throwing techniques: backhand and forehand (or sidearm). These techniques vary in effectiveness under different circumstances. Their understanding and mastery can greatly improve a player's game, and offer diverse options in maneuvering the disc to the basket with greater efficacy. Many players use what is referred to as a run-up during their drive. This is practiced to build more forward disc momentum and distance. Throwing styles vary from player to player, and there is no standard throwing style.

All discs when thrown will naturally fall to a certain direction, this direction is termed Hyzer, the natural fall of the disc, or Anhyzer, making the disc fall against its natural flight pattern. For a right-handed backhand throw (RHBH), the disc will naturally fall to the left. For a right-handed forehand throw (RHFH), the disc will naturally fall to the right. For a left-handed, backhand throw (LHBH), the disc will naturally fall to the right. For a left-handed, forehand throw (LHFH), the disc will naturally fall to the left.

(Source: wikipedia.org)

Rules (in English)
Disc golf courses in Finland (in Finnish)